Bed Bug Warning

Clothing Rack

A bit of information that you might like to know about keeping your home bed bug free.   Recently there has been news that several stores in NYC have had to close due to bed bug problems, as well as a complete mall in New Jersey.

Much of our clothing, sheets, towels, etc. now comes from companies outside  of America, (sad but true), even the most expensive stores sell foreign clothing from China, Indonesia, etc.  The bed bugs are coming in on the clothing as these countries do not consider them a problem.  We recommend that if you buy any new clothing, even underwear and socks, sheets, towels, etc. that you bring them into the house and put them in your clothes dryer for at least 20 minutes.  The heat will kill them and their eggs.  DO NOT PURCHASE CLOTHES AND HANG THEM IN THE CLOSET FIRST.  It does not matter what the price range is of the clothing, or if the outfit comes from the most expensive store known in the U.S.   They still get shipments from these countries and the bugs can come in a box of scarves or anything else for that matter.  That is the reason why so many stores, many of them clothing stores have had to shut it down in NYC and other places.   All you need is to bring one item into the house that has bugs or eggs and you will go to hell and back trying to get rid of them.

Send this information on to those on your e-mail list so that this good prevention information gets around quickly.

 

http://www.biotechtermiteandpest.com

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New York Times Bed Bug Article

Read the entire article at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/21/nyregion/21bedbugs.html?_r=2&th&emc=th

Jeremy Sparig spent months fighting bedbugs. Now, to some people, he is like a mattress left on the street, something best avoided in these times.

“They don’t want to hug you anymore; they don’t want you coming over,” said Mr. Sparig, of East Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “You’re like a leper.”

At the Brooklyn district attorney’s office, which recently had a bedbug breakout, defense lawyers are skittish about visiting, and it is not because of the fierce prosecutors.

Even Steven Smollens, a housing lawyer who has helped many tenants with bedbugs, has his guard up. Those clients are barred from his office. “I meet outside,” he said. “There’s a Starbucks across the street.”

Beyond the bites and the itching, the bother and the expense, victims of the nation’s most recent plague are finding that an invisible scourge awaits them in the form of bedbug stigma. Friends begin to keep their distance. Invitations are rescinded. For months, one woman said, her mother was afraid to tell her that she had an infestation. When she found out and went to clean her mother’s apartment, she said, “Nobody wanted to help me.” Read more….

Read the entire article at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/21/nyregion/21bedbugs.html?_r=2&th&emc=th

New York Times Article

Bedbugs, the bloodsucking scourges of sleepers everywhere, have had a mighty resurgence in recent years, enabled largely by their now-widespread resistance to once highly effective pesticides. After being virtually wiped out in the United States in the mid-20th century, infestations have again become common in cities from coast to coast.

Chad Batka for The New York Times

The epidemic nature of the rebound, combined with the high cost of professional pest control, is causing some homeowners at their wits end to turn to do-it-yourself solutions that could put them and their families at risk, according to a new consumer alert from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Of particular concern are growing reports of homeowners and renters’ applying pesticides within their homes that are approved only for outdoor use. The improper use of these chemicals can make people and their pets sick, the E.P.A. said.

“When people become increasingly desperate, they start doing these kinds of things,” said Michael F. Potter, an entomologist and bedbug expert at the University of Kentucky. “It’s a concern.”

Other dubious do-it-yourself solutions include the heavy application within the home of products like bleach, ammonia, kerosene and alcohol, and the intensive use of “bug bombs,” wasp sprays and other conventional insecticides not specifically designed to kill bedbugs. These methods are not only ineffective but can pose a fire hazard.

“What’s the harm in this? Some of this stuff is highly flammable,” Dr. Potter said. “You can burn your house down.”

The E.P.A. alert also warned consumers that inexpensive quick-fix solutions advertised widely on the Internet were of limited value in fighting infestations. Among the products touted online as sure-fire bedbug killers are products like diatomaceous earth – a powder made from the ground-up shells of tiny marine organisms. These powders can kill bedbugs and are used by professional exterminators in concert with pesticides and other techniques. But when used alone and by a nonprofessional, they are unlikely to get rid of an infestation.

“If it was that easy, if all those products were so great, don’t you think the professional pest control industry would have this thing licked?” Dr. Potter said. “It takes more than just buying a powder to get rid of this bug.”

August 11, 2010, 7:49 AM

Perils of Do-It-Yourself Bedbug Control

By JOHN COLLINS RUDOLF

Bedbugs, the bloodsucking scourges of sleepers everywhere, have had a mighty resurgence in recent years, enabled largely by their now-widespread resistance to once highly effective pesticides. After being virtually wiped out in the United States in the mid-20th century, infestations have again become common in cities from coast to coast.

Chad Batka for The New York Times

The epidemic nature of the rebound, combined with the high cost of professional pest control, is causing some homeowners at their wits end to turn to do-it-yourself solutions that could put them and their families at risk, according to a new consumer alert from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Of particular concern are growing reports of homeowners and renters’ applying pesticides within their homes that are approved only for outdoor use. The improper use of these chemicals can make people and their pets sick, the E.P.A. said.

“When people become increasingly desperate, they start doing these kinds of things,” said Michael F. Potter, an entomologist and bedbug expert at the University of Kentucky. “It’s a concern.”

Other dubious do-it-yourself solutions include the heavy application within the home of products like bleach, ammonia, kerosene and alcohol, and the intensive use of “bug bombs,” wasp sprays and other conventional insecticides not specifically designed to kill bedbugs. These methods are not only ineffective but can pose a fire hazard.

“What’s the harm in this? Some of this stuff is highly flammable,” Dr. Potter said. “You can burn your house down.”

The E.P.A. alert also warned consumers that inexpensive quick-fix solutions advertised widely on the Internet were of limited value in fighting infestations. Among the products touted online as sure-fire bedbug killers are products like diatomaceous earth – a powder made from the ground-up shells of tiny marine organisms. These powders can kill bedbugs and are used by professional exterminators in concert with pesticides and other techniques. But when used alone and by a nonprofessional, they are unlikely to get rid of an infestation.

“If it was that easy, if all those products were so great, don’t you think the professional pest control industry would have this thing licked?” Dr. Potter said. “It takes more than just buying a powder to get rid of this bug.”

Workers bees of the world unite! But not in my home.

The Bible states 17 times at Isreal is “the land of milk and honey.” And 3 years ago, researchers found a 3,000-year-old apiary in the Iron Age city of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest known beekeeping facility in the world. While man as benefited from honey bees by their pollination and honey they collect, they can be serious pests at times.

Bees have been around for 100 million years. You can’t tell the difference between those bees and the ones we see today. Honey Bees have developed barbs on their stinger which remain hooked in the skin. The stinger, connected to the digestive system of the bee, is torn out of the abdomen as the bee attempts to fly away. As a result, the bee soon dies.

The victims don’t care whether the little honeybee lives or dies. Most victims suffer reactions range from burning, itching, redness, swelling and itching that may last up to a week. Although some experience more serious allergic reactions that are life threatening.

Honey bees are normally housed in manufactured hives and managed by beekeepers, but wild colonies of honey bees may nest in hollow trees or in wall voids in your home. Sometimes they nest within the wall or attic some distance from where they enter the wall.

Killing adult bees is easy, but the removal of the comb and honey are very difficult. Bees from other colonies may come to your home as long as honey remains in the killed colony. Also, other insects, such as carpet beetles, ants, or flies, are also attracted to killed bee colonies.

It’s best to contact a pest control company to destroy the bees.

Spring is in the air, and so are 477 species of bees.

In New York and New Jersey, it is estimated to be 477 species of bees. And Spring begins their active season, which can last through Fall depending on the species. Bees are important to the environment and help pollinate flowers, but they can spell trouble to a home-owner.

Female bees start the Spring by building nests and underground tunnels. They also begin colonizing in your walls or attics. All they need are an easy access into your home, like wall outlets or chimneys. Unchecked, they can damage your home.

And if you get them excited, they’ll swarm and chase you, even in Manhattan. Bee stings hurt, and if you’re highly allergic, they can kill you.

Pesticides will kill a bee colony, but at what cost? The poisons that are strong enough to kill them, are strong enough to harm your family, pets and your garden. Luckily, there is a new generation of exterminators who take an environmentally safe approach to pest control. By using biocides, there’s little risk to your health and the environment.

Who ever heard of a killing roaches — and helping the enviroment at the same time?

Roaches, roaches, roaches. They are everywhere: in and around homes, apartments, supermarkets, food processing plants, and restaurants. There are 4,000 cockroach species worldwide but most plentiful species is our German cockroach.

You’ve tried sprays and powders to control them, but are your methods safe? They may harm your family, and still not control your pests. Pesticides can be extremely unsafe, and can cause both short and long-term damage to people and the environment.

Modern pest control services, like Biotech, use ecological biocides — germicides, antibiotics, antibacterials, antivirals, antifungals, antiprotozoals and antiparasites — and are safer than traditional pesticides. They are environmentally friendly.

It’s best to avoiding toxic chemicals. Using biocides with natural based ingredients can get the job done and help save the environment.

How carpenter ants are mistaken for termites

Your home has damaged porch pillars, roofs, or window sills. You can see the wood has been tunneled and is weakened. But is the culprit termites or carpenter ants?

Check the damage. Do the smooth tunnels lack sawdust or other debris? Are the areas clean with a well sanded appearance?

If you answered yes, then you may have a carpenter ant problem. While carpenter ant damage is cosmetic and rarely causes structural damage, you need to exterminate the colony. Carpenter Ants are considered serious pests. Wood decay may be caused by exposure to leaks, condensation, or poor air circulation.

Carpenter ants are large, black, or sometimes red and black from 1/4 inch for a worker and up to 3/4 inch for a queen. Carpenter ants are active indoors during many months of the year, usually during the spring and summer.

Nests can be behind bathroom tiles, around tubs, sinks, showers, and dishwashers. You can find them under roofing, in attic beams, or under insulation. They even live in hollow spaces such as doors, curtain rods, and wall voids. Carpenter ants may also nest in foam insulation.

How do you rid your home of them? Extermination should be performed by an experienced pest control provider. They have the experience and a wider array of products to more effectively control your carpenter ant problem. Home owners play a crucial role in control programs. You can provide information as when, where, and how many ants were seen.

Why your mosquito bites may not be made by mosqitos.

Bedbug bites

Bedbug bites look like mosquito bites

Say you’ve got a few mosquito bits on your arm, but those itchy bites don’t seem to go away. You may have been bitten by a bedbug. Bedbug bites are very similar from mosquito bites, but they last for longer periods and can include severe itching, blisters or hives.

The little buggers feeding for about five minutes, then return to its hiding place. The bites cannot usually be felt for several hours up to 9 days later.

Bedbugs live anywhere, not just in your mattress, but in furniture, behind wallpaper, and in small floor cracks. Bedbugs don’t care if your home is clean or dirty. All they need is you and plenty of hiding places.

Infestation within a household can go undetected. But how do you know if you have bedbugs? It’s best to find an expert trained to spot them. Not only will they detect them, but they’ll offer proven treatments to safely eliminate them.